close

  • Faithful to my Homeland, the Republic of Poland

    Archive website
    The MFA has a new website: www.gov.pl/diplomacy

  • The Polish parliament’s foreign affairs committee approved on Wednesday the selection of two deputy foreign ministers for ambassadorships: Henryka Mościckiej-Dendys for Copenhagen and Leszek Soczewica for Bratislava.

     

    The nominations were recommended to the parliamentarians by Foreign Minister Grzegorz Schetyna. At the start of the committee’s proceedings, Minister Schetyna dismissed speculation that the nominations were a calculated measure taken in light of a possible defeat in parliamentary elections this autumn. He said that the procedure to nominate the two candidates was started in early March.

     

    Presenting the conceptual framework of her ambassadorship, Mościcka-Dendys said that Poland and Denmark were linked by an increasingly strong economic relationship, a shared outlook on security policy, agreement on the need to strengthen NATO’s Eastern Flank, as well as an interest in the EU Neighbourhood’s Eastern Dimension and a shared vision for the future of the EU.

     

    “We want more Europe rather than less Europe and as countries not part of the Eurozone we want to be close to the discussions about the new structure of a economic and monetary union; we don’t want it to hamper the functioning of the single market,” the Deputy Minister said. She added that there are, of course, topics where Poland and Denmark did not necessarily see eye to eye, in particular climate change.

     

    Mościcka-Dendys said that in her work she hopes to concentrate on promoting a positive image of Poles and Poland within Danish society. “Danes still do not know much about us, and what they do know is often tainted by negative stereotypes and experiences dating back to Communist times,” she said. In order to remedy this, the minister said that she intends to strengthen social, academic and municipal ties.

     

    Foreign Minister Schetyna said that the change of ambassador in Bratislava was due to the nomination of the current ambassador, Tomasz Chłoń, to the position of government plenipotentiary, responsible for organising the NATO Summit in Warsaw next year.

     

    Presenting the conceptual framework of his Bratislava ambassadorship, Soczewica said that he intends to focus on the dynamically evolving economic relationship between Poland and Slovakia, on one hand, and security issues on the other.

     

    He stressed that Slovakia’s role in the latter, being part of NATO’s Eastern Flank, would no doubt increase in the years to come as a result of the dim outlook for the improvement of the security situation in the East. Soczewica said that Polish-Slovak trade turnover in 2014 amounted to 7.2 billion euros, in Poland’s favour. In the same year, Poland exported goods to Slovakia worth a total of 4 billion euros. Poland is Slovakia’s third biggest economic partner after Germany and Slovakia.

     

    Soczewica said he intends to support Polish business interests in Slovakia and will also work towards rebuilding road and rail infrastructure. He will also support co-operation within the defence sector.

     

    Henryka Mościcka-Dendys is a career diplomat, a graduate of law and philology from the University of Silesia. She obtained her doctorate in international law from the University of Warsaw in 2007. Mościcka-Dendys sits on the board of the Foundation for Polish-German Co-operation.

     

    She has been affiliated with the Foreign Ministry since 2002, when she was accepted during a diplomatic-consular recruitment round open to the public. She then climbed the ranks, from attaché to senior advisor.

     

    From the very start of her career, Mościcka-Dendys has been involved with European policy – first within the EU Accession Negotiation Department (in 2002), later in 2003 as an expert in the office of the Commissioner for Democratic Development at the Council of the Baltic Sea States in Copenhagen.

     

    Upon her return from Denmark, she was responsible for the co-ordination of European policy with the EU Department. Between 2007 and 2011 she was initially the First Secretary and later Counsellor at the Polish Embassy in Berlin.

     

    In 2011-2012 Mościcka-Dendys was the Deputy Director of the Department of European Policy with a focus on Institutional and Northern European Affairs. From August 2012 to April 2013 she was the Director of the Department of European Policy. In April 2013 she was appointed Undersecretary of State in the Foreign Ministry, with a focus on parliamentary issues, European policy and human rights. She still holds this position.

     

    Mościcka-Dendys speaks fluent German, English and Russian. In November 2012 she was awarded the Golden Cross of Merit by the Polish president.

     

    Leszek Soczewica is a graduate of the Faculty of Cybernetics at the Military University of Technology. He has the rank of Major-General within the reserves. Soczewica completed business studies in the United States and received a Masters in Political Science from the NATO Defence Academy in Rome. Soczewica served in the Polish army for 35 years, where he was responsible for various aspects of foreign policy at the Ministry of Defence.

     

    He was in charge of the Department of Military Foreign Relations, the Strategic Council of the General Staff of the Polish Armed Forces as well as the Reconnaissance and Intelligence Analysis Directorate of the General Staff.

     

    Soczewica was sent on diplomatic postings on two occasions. After Poland’s accession to NATO in 1999, he set up the military attaché position in Lisbon while also acting as Poland’s liaison officer at NATO’s Joint Force Command.

     

    He held the position of defence, military, naval, air attaché at the Polish embassy in Washington. Soczewica was also a representative of the Polish Military Mission to the Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission in the Republic of South Korea. Since July 2014 he has served as an Undersecretary of State at the Foreign Ministry, focusing on American Affairs and Security Policy. He is fluent in English, Portuguese and Russian.

     

    Source: PAP

     

     

    Drukuj Print Share: